No name woman essay by maxine hong kingston

No Name Woman Summary Kingston learns from her mother that she once had an aunt who killed herself and her newborn baby by jumping into the family well in China. The woman's husband had left the country years before, so the villagers knew that the child was illegitimate. The night that the baby was born, the villagers raided and destroyed the family house, and the woman gave birth in a pigsty.

No name woman essay by maxine hong kingston

In China your father had a sister who killed herself. She jumped into the family well. We say that your father has all brothers because it is as if she had never been born. For example, here in "No Name Woman," Kingston says of her mother, who, we later learn, is named Brave Orchid, "Whenever she had to warn us about life, my mother told stories that ran like this one [about No Name Woman], a story to grow up on.

No name woman essay by maxine hong kingston

She tested our strength to establish realities. Because of this realistic-magical aspect, a talk-story can be as confusing to its audience — Kingston and her readers — as it can be inspiring. Shunned by her family, the aunt gave birth in a pigsty, alone.

Due to failing crops and a poor domestic economy, many of the men from the ancestral village in China were forced to leave their farms to seek work, traveling as far as America, which the Chinese nicknamed "Gold Mountain" because the original Chinese immigrants initially perceived it as a bountiful land where a good living could be made working in the gold-mining industry.

Brave Orchid explains to her daughter about the aunt, "Now that you have started to menstruate, what happened to her could happen to you. The villagers are watchful. Kingston notes of her mother, "Whenever she had to warn us about life, my mother told stories that ran like this one, a story to grow up on.

Kingston knows that her mother is concerned that she not have premarital sex because her mother directly states that that is the reason for telling the story.

In "No Name Woman," Kingston writes, "Those of us in the first American generations have had to figure out how the invisible world the emigrants built around our childhood fits into solid America. How to reconcile this conflict between these two disparate cultures becomes her thesis, the problem she attempts — and ultimately succeeds — to solve.

What is Chinese tradition and what is the movies? The larger issue, then, becomes how Kingston will integrate such talk-stories into her own personal life as she grows from childhood to womanhood, and just how relevant these tales of life in China are to a first-generation Chinese American with Chinese-born parents.

“No Name Woman” Maxine Hong Kingston Essay Sample

To her American sensibilities, the stories are confusing because they are based on a Chinese context. She learns to talk-story by having listened to her mother. In this way, a continuity is established between her mother, who represents the cultural traditions of China, and herself as a first-generation Chinese American.

Kingston will finally acknowledge this succession of generations when, at the end of "Shaman," she compares herself favorably to her mother and proudly recognizes their many similarities: I am practically a first daughter of a first daughter.

This inability emphasizes what Kingston argues is the great disparity between how women and men were supposed to act: Some man had commanded her to lie with him and be his secret evil.

No name woman essay by maxine hong kingston

She obeyed him; she always did as she was told. Kingston also exposes the unfair discrimination against women in traditional Chinese society when she discusses how sons are celebrated more than daughters.The book is a collection of Maxine Hong Kingston's memoirs, so it is technically a work of nonfiction.

But the author is careful never to mention her name in the narrative. This is presumably because the book, while grounded in truth, does not maintain a clear boundary between reality and fantasy.

After graduation from the To Keung School, Brave Orchid returns home to perform what services?

The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts is a book written by Chinese American author Maxine Hong Kingston and published by Alfred A.

Knopf in The book blends autobiography with what Kingston purports to be old Chinese folktales, although several scholars have questioned the accuracy and authenticity of these . A summary of Chapter One: No Name Woman in Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Woman Warrior and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. No Name Woman – by Maxine Hong Kingston "You must not tell anyone," my mother said, "what I am about to tell you. In China your father had a sister who killed herself. "No Name Woman", by Maxine Hong Kingston, is a story of Maxine's family who are Chinese-Americans.

When Maxine's mother warned her about life, she told stories that tested her strength to establish realities. Maxine Hong Kingston begins her search for a personal identity with the story of an aunt, to whom this first chapter's title refers.

Ironically, the first thing we read is Kingston's mother's warning Kingston, "You must not tell anyone what I am about to tell you.

The Theme of the Voiceless Woman in The Woman Warrior